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Red Sox Organization Report

John Tomase -Premium Content

The Red Sox' list of pitching prospects would look markedly different without the supplemental first round of the 2005 draft. First came Clay Buchholz with the 42nd overall pick. He's regarded as the organization's top pitching prospect. But not far behind is the man picked just five spots later. Righthander Michael Bowden opened 2007 by building smartly on a solid 2006.

Majors | #2007#Boston Red Sox#Organization Reports

Red Sox Organization Report

John Tomase -Premium Content

Few numbers get a pitcher noticed quite like 100. Suffice it to say Red Sox first-round pick Daniel Bard has gotten noticed. Bard, 21, hasn't technically thrown an inning for the organization yet, signing too late in August to join an affiliate. But his work in instructional league was eye opening, particularly for those who hold radar guns.

Majors | #2006#Boston Red Sox#Organization Reports

Red Sox Organization Report

John Tomase -Premium Content

Outfielder David Murphy has experienced pretty much every emotion since being the first pick of Theo Epstein's first draft class in 2003. He knows what it's like to be compared with Fred Lynn. And he knows what it's like to be considered a bust, after a foot injury wrecked his 2004 season. But none of that matters now that Murphy knows another thing—what it's like to be a big leaguer.

Majors | #2006#Boston Red Sox#Organization Reports

Red Sox Organization Report

John Tomase -Premium Content

Few have followed a stranger path to the upper levels of the minor leagues than Devern Hansack. The 28-year-old Nicaraguan righthander hadn't pitched in the states in three years when Red Sox executive Craig Shipley spotted him at a tournament in Holland late last fall. Shipley liked Hansack's live arm and, since he would come cheaply as a minor league free agent, the Red Sox took a flier and signed him in December.

Majors | #2006#Boston Red Sox#Organization Reports