Ask BA: The Top 100 Prospect Also-Rans, From A.J. Cole To Yorman Rodriguez

Q:Each year, you guys usually release the list of all players receiving votes in the personal Top 150s … with how many votes they got, as well as their peak vote. I was hoping we can keep that tradition alive!

Thanks! Brian Koperski, Buffalo, New York

 

BA: There were 111 players who did not make the Top 100 Prospects list who made at least one Baseball America staffers Top 150 personal list. Eight players made all seven ballots—Brian Goodwin, A.J. Cole, Hak-Ju Lee, Phillip Ervin, Sean Manaea, Hunter Harvey,  Taylor Guerrieri and Casey Kelly. Not coincidentally, seven came close to making the Top 100.

Here’s a look at everyone who didn’t make the Top 100 but did receive a vote, listed in alphabetical order. Peak ranking is the highest ranking the player received on any ballot.

Player No. of Ballots Peak Ranking
A.J. Cole 7 49
Aaron Judge 1 150
Adalberto Mejia 3 132
Albert Tirado 1 148
Alex Colome 2 99
Alex Gonzalez 5 111
Alex Reyes 2 126
Alexander Guerrero 2 106
Amed Rosario, ss 3 118
Anthony DeSclafani 1 142
Anthony Ranaudo 5 109
Asher Wojciehowski 2 103
Billy Burns 1 145
Billy McKinney 5 60
Brandon Nimmo 1 113
Brandon Workman 4 95
Brian Goodwin 7 51
Bruce Rondon 6 80
Bubba Starling 6 68
C.J. Cron, 1b 3 134
Casey Kelly 7 71
Chad Bettis 2 120
Chris Anderson 5 131
Chris Stratton 3 96
Chris Withrow 3 129
Christian Arroyo 3 116
Christian Vasquez 1 149
Cody Anderson 2 144
D.J. Davis 6 87
Dallas Beeler 1 144
Dan Norris 3 115
Danny Hultzen 1 146
David Holmberg 1 138
Delino DeShields 2 102
Deven Marrero 1 127
Domingo Santana 6 102
Dorssys Paulino 2 150
Eddie Rosario 6 92
Eloy Jimenez 1 119
Enny Romero 5 104
Eric Jagielo 4 131
Franklin Baretto 4 101
Gabriel Ynoa 1 148
Gary Brown 1 140
Gosuke Katoh 1 147
Greg Bird 1 97
Hak-Ju Lee 7 87
Harold Ramirez 2 117
Henry Urrutia 2 142
Hunter Dozier 5 93
Hunter Harvey 7 86
Hunter Morris 1 136
Ian Clarkin 1 135
J.O. Berrios 6 69
J.R. Murphy 2 122
Jace Peterson 2 112
Jake Thompson 2 121
James Ramsey 1 127
Jason Hursh 4 92
Jeimer Candelario 1 126
Jesse Winker 6 70
Joe Ross 1 125
Johnny Hellweg 1 106
Jonathan Crawford 3 116
Jonathan Schoop 6 91
Jose Peraza 3 125
Josh Bell 4 94
Justin Nicolino 5 111
Kevin Plawecki 3 109
Kyle Parker 4 111
Lewis Thorpe 4 119
Luis Sardinas 4 90
Luis Severino 1 150
Luiz Gohara 4 125
Luke Jackson 1 148
Mac Williamson 1 112
Manuel Margot 1 149
Marco Gonzales 6 110
Mason Williams 6 90
Matt Barnes 4 104
Matt Skole 1 140
Matt Stites 1 143
Mauricio Cabrera 4 88
Max Stassi 1 149
Micah Johnson 5 100
Michael Ynoa 1 119
Miguel Almonte 6 70
Miguel Gonzalez 3 71
Mitch Haniger 2 100
Mitch Nay 5 127
Nick Ciuffo 3 141
Onelki Garcia 1 105
Phillip Ervin 7 78
Raul Alcantara 3 109
Rob Kaminsky 3 117
Robbie Ray 4 105
Roberto Osuna 1 128
Ronald Guzman 1 141
Rymer Liriano 2 74
Sean Manaea 7 84
Slade Heathcott 6 89
Steven Matz 1 139
Taylor Guerrieri 7 82
Tim Cooney 2 121
Trevor May 2 118
Tyler Naquin 3 87
Tyrone Taylor 5 107
Victor Roache 1 134
Vince Velasquez 4 95
Wilmer Flores 1 133
Yorman Rodriguez 5 103

Aaron Judge, Luis Severino and Dorssys Paulino all ended up with no votes above No. 150, but they all did get votes. All three could climb significantly in next year’s balloting with solid 2014 seasons as all three are still young enough to have significant upside.


Q: I’ve been wondering about the differences between four shortstops that seem awfully similar to one another. How do you make out Domingo Leyba, Ketel Marte, Sergio Alcantara, and Abiatal Avelino?

Justin Perline, Armonk, NY

 

BA: They do have similarities but I also see some significant differences. In our Baseball America Prospect Handbook, Leyba (Tigers), Alcantara (Diamondbacks) and Avelino (Yankees) all ended up as 55 Extremes in the BA Grades while Marte was a 45 High, so there is some separation there between Marte and the other three.

Leyba and Marte are most likely to end up at second base. There are scouts who believe that either of them could handle shortstop, but a study I recently did shows that top prospects who face a question about playing shortstop or another position end up playing somewhere other than shortstop in the big leagues roughly 70 percent of the time. Leyba and Marte are two who have looked better at second base than shortstop so far.

Avelino and Alcantara are safer bets to stick, although Avelino’s build means he’d probably have quickly moved off the position 30 years ago. Nowadays, teams are willing to let a stockier shortstop stick at the position until he proves he can’t handle it, and the early indications are that Avelino can.

Forced to chose one of the four, I’d pick Alcantara because he has the best chance to combine plus defense at shortstop with potential above-average offensive tools as well. Avelino is right there with him. I’d say Leyba is a slight tick behind those two. His bat is pretty similar, but his defense is a little bit behind theirs. Then Marte is a rung behind Leyba with less upside and more questions about his hitting ability.