Baseball America Full-Season College Stat Roundup

With the draft one day away, let’s take a look at the full-season statistics for the college players in the Baseball America Top 200. Please note that these stats were assembled before the last weekend’s regional play, so the players on the teams that made it to the tournament will have marginally different statistics than what is below. But the impact of a few games for a position player or a single game as a pitcher is likely to be minimal when take in context of a season’s worth of stats. The green and red shading signify when a player is in the upper or lower 15 percent of a specific statistic.

Carlos Rodon

Carlos Rodon (Photo by Brian Westerholt)

• Carlos Rodon entered the season as the No. 1 player in the class based on a combination of his stuff and track record. But his year has largely not met the lofty expectations the industry had for him. While his stronghold on the top spot has slipped, he is considered a strong bet to go in the top four selections while also being something of a unique case study from a statistical perspective.

To put Rodon’s career and junior season in proper historical context, it was instructive to look at his aspirant (and likely) peer group, college pitchers selected in the top 10, a data set of 34 pitchers from 2004-2013.

College pitchers who warrant the investment of a top-10 overall selection typically are talented enough to make an immediate impact on campus and continue to improve upon that baseline performance. Rodon was no different as a freshman, emerging prominently into one of the best college pitchers in the country. For college pitchers, performance begets draft status, especially while lefthanded, and Rodon entered his junior season with one of the best statistical track records of the group, as well as plus stuff, after his stellar sophomore year.

Rodon boasted an elite strikeout rate of 12.51 as a sophomore, the second-highest rate of any pitcher with more than 25 innings pitched in the rotation, behind only David Price‘s 13.9 (NOTE: Thomas Diamond had a higher strikeout rate at 12.52 but started only three games. Casey Weathers struck out 19.13 but in only eight innings). Entering this season, Rodon was heralded as potentially the best college lefthander since Price, and the statistics back up that assertion. His strikeout-walk ratio (4.1) was the 10th best of the group and fifth for lefthanders, again behind Price and a trio of Danny Hultzen, Brian Matusz and Jeremy Sowers.

These pitchers who enter their junior seasons with high performance standards typically take that performance to new levels. That is where Rodon is different.

The median walk rate for the group was cut by 22 percent from freshman to sophomore year and another 20 percent as a junior. But Rodon’s control increases have been incremental, improving by five percent from freshman to sophomore year and 7.5 percent from sophomore year to junior year. While this was below-average for the group, 29 percent of the pitchers saw their walk rate increase or not improve by as much as Rodon.

The median strikeout per-nine increase from freshman year to sophomore year was 14 and 11 percent the next year. This is where Rodon’s performance diverges dramatically from the group because his strikeout rate fell by 15 percent from 12.5 to 10.9 as a junior. Although the group’s median strikeout rate was significantly lower than Rodon earlier in it college careers, its junior year strikeout rate (10.6) was nearly identical to Rodon (10.7). Only one pitcher who was in the rotation saw his strikeout rate shrink by as much or more than Rodon’s did (Greg Reynolds fits this description but was used out of the bullpen as a sophomore).

Rodon, whose strikeout-walk rate fell by eight percent, is one of six pitchers whose strikeout-walk ratio eroded as a junior. The other five are Jeff Niemann, Mike Pelfrey, Wade Townsend, Daniel Moskos and Drew Pomeranz.

Looking more granularly at Rodon’s (likely) direct peer group of top five pitches shows that the coveted arms that go at the top of the draft show even greater improvement than the group as a whole, improving their strikeout-walk ratio by an average of 35 percent compared to an eight percent reduction for Rodon.

Rodon’s numbers are strong but don’t jump out when comparing him to the rest of the 2014 college pitching crop. His strikeout per-nine (10.7) is 11th in the group of 55 college pitchers (80th percentile) who made the top 200 and his strikeout percent (27.9) is 13th. His 7.4 percent walk rate is exactly the median for the group. Rodon’s strikeout-walk rate of 3.77 also ranks 13th.

One of the knocks scouts have had against Rodon this season is that he has not improved as much as they would like and wonder how much improvement they can project him to make in pro ball. Statistically speaking, that is certainly the case. His junior year strikeout rate (10.7) is nearly identical to his freshman year (10.6) with incremental gains in his walk rate from, from 3.2 to 2.8.

Tyler Beede

Tyler Beede (Photo by Danny Parker)

• Vanderbilt righthander Tyler Beede began the season as the No. 3 college pitcher behind Rodon and Jeff Hoffman. He has electric stuff and the potential for three plus pitches. But his performance and control have not met expectations. Beede struggled in the SEC tournament but had one of the best starts of his season in regional play last week. His control has lagged behind his stuff throughout his career. His walks per nine this year (3.9) is the lowest of his career and is the bottom quartile of top 200. For his career, Beede has walked 4.6, the third highest rate of any college pitcher draft in the first round from 2009-2013, a group of 42 pitchers. The only higher walk rates were Alex Meyer (5.4) and Matt Harvey (4.7). His career strikeout-walk ratio (2.00) is lower than all but four pitchers: Eric Arnett (1.8), Chris Reed (1.97), Ryne Stanek (1.97) and Alex Meyer (1.99).

• Although he did not play in a power conference, Kennesaw State catcher Max Pentecost’s statistical year, especially for an up-the-middle player, is fairly remarkable, as he performed well in almost every offensive category. While much of his average was fueled by an unsustainable BABIP of .438 (and he has not shown a history of high BABIPs with an average of .329 from his first two years), he produced the highest batting average (.423/.477/.634) of any NCAA hitter in the top 200. Pentecost has controlled the strike zone extremely well while showing advanced bat-to-ball skills and above-average contact rates, striking out in 8.6 percent of his plate appearances, the sixth-lowest rate, with just as many walks as strikeouts. Pentecost has plus raw power and has hit for above-average power on contact, with an ISO of .211. The plus athlete has drawn comparisons to Jason Kendall as a catcher with plus wheels. He has stolen the sixth-most bases of any player with 16 bases in 18 tries (89 percent success rate), the most of any non-outfielder or Trea Turner. While most expect his raw speed to back up under the everyday rigors of catching in pro ball, the most sanguine evaluators believe his speed with play as at least plus at maturity because of his first-step quickness and instincts.

• Virginia Tech catcher Mark Zagunis has to enter the discussion when talking about athletic catchers with plus run tools. He has the advantage of playing on a turf field at home and put that to use, posting times below 4.1 seconds at his best from the right side. He is also tied with Pentecost at 16 steals in 19 tries (84 percent). Zagunis has an advanced approach at the plate, walking in 13 percent of his plate appearances while striking out in 8.0 percent, the fourth-lowest rate of any NCAA player. The righthanded-hitting Zagunis will flash raw power in batting practice and has a strong, physical build, but faces questions about how his power will play with the third-lowest ISO of any hitter at .096.

• Kentucky first baseman A.J. Reed’s power production this season is among the best in the new offensive era of college baseball and is college baseball’s version of a three-true-outcomes player. Reed, who leads the NCAA with 23 home runs, has an ISO of .417. The next highest ISO is Caleb Adam’s .325. Reed also walks at an above-average rate of 17.2 percent that ranked fourth, but there is some swing-and-miss to his game with the 16.8 percent strikeout rate, the seventh-highest rate. Reed has walked, struck out or hit a home run in 42 percent of his plate appearances, the highest rate by a significant margin.

Taylor Sparks

• UC Irvine corner infielder Taylor Sparks faces a tough offensive profile because of his high strikeout rates. He has struck out in 23 percent of his plate appearances and 24.9 percent this season, the highest rate of any hitter by more than three percent. With such a high strikeout rate in college, his other offensive skills (on-base, power and average on contact) will have to be well above-average to overcome that deficiency. Despite having plus raw power, his other skills haven’t supported his strikeout-prone profile. His ISO this season (.185) is almost identical to the group median (.187), while playing in an offensive park (105 park factor) and his walk rate (9.7 percent) is a tick worse than the median (10.9). Hence, he is putting a tremendous amount of pressure on his ability to get hits on balls in player as a below-average runner. He has shown some ability to do that this year (.378 BABIP) and last year (.400) while acknowledging that is a very small sample (496 plate appearances).

• Pepperdine lefthander/outfielder Aaron Brown has had a strong two-way season and is considered a top-five round talent in both roles. As an outfielder he faces a tough offensive profile despite plus raw power that has produced an above-average ISO of .242. Brown offers minimal on-base ability with a 3.3 percent walk rate, the lowest of any hitter, and below-average contact frequency with a 20.5 percent strikeout rate. If Brown goes out as a position player, he is putting tremendous pressure on his power and ability to gets hits on contact.

• Fresno State outfielder Jordan Luplow faces a tough profile as a 6-foot-1, 195-pound, righthand-hitting corner outfielder without plus power. But he has shown the secondary skills necessary for that offensive profile, while improving his plate discipline dramatically. In his first two seasons, Luplow had produced low walk rates (5.6 percent) and high strikeout rates (18.5). But this season he cut his strikeout rate in half (8.4 percent, the fifth-best rate) more than doubled his walk rate to 13.7 percent while hitting for at least average or a tick better power (.232 ISO). Luplow is getting interest in the top three rounds with a chance to go better than that.

• Mississippi State lefthander Jacob Lindgren has put up Craig Kimbrel-type strikeout rates this year and has late helium. He has the highest strikeout rate this season (45.6 percent of hitters) for a rate of 16.4 per-nine, producing a 4.4 strikeout-walk ratio.

• Louisville righthander Nick Burdi is nipping on his heels in both strikeout categories with a 44.5 percent strikeout rate and 16.0 per-nine. His walks per-nine is nearly a full walk-and-a-half lower at 2.3, producing a 7.1 strikeout-walk rate.

• Lefthander Brandon Finnegan (Texas Christian) and Matt Imhof (Cal Poly), who have the two highest strikeout rates of any college starters, battled for the strikeout lead for the much of the year before the strikeout pace slowed down the stretch. They offer contrasting body types but produced nearly identical strikeout rates this season: Imhof (32.9 percent; 11.8 per-nine) and Finnegan (32.8; 11.8). Finnegan (2.6 per-nine) had superior control numbers to Imhof (3.8).

Kyle Freeland

Kyle Freeland (Photo by Steven Harris)

• While Evansville lefthander Kyle Freeland’s walk rate increased down the stretch, he still finished with the best control numbers of any college arm, walking 3.3 percent of hitters and 1.2 per-nine for a strikeout-walk ratio of 9.9. His strikeout rate of 32.1 percent was the third-highest of any college starter, behind Finnegan and Imhof, making the top three college starters by strikeout rate lefthanders and four of the top six (Sean Newcomb).

• Another lefthander with outstanding control is Miami lefthander Andrew Suarez, who has walked only 3.5 percent of hitters. His walk numbers are incrementally worse than Freeland, but better than every other college pitcher at 1.3 walks per-nine. Suarez saw a significant velocity increase last fall that he held through the early part of the season before dropping a little bit in the middle of the season. But his velocity has returned down the stretch, touching 96 while sitting 91-93. His strikeout rate (6.9) is below the group median (8.4).

• Although Arkansas righthander Chris Oliver has one of the best fastballs in the college ranks, sitting in the mid-90s and touching 98 at his best, production is less than expected given his pure stuff. His strikeout rate (5.6) is the fifth-lowest of the group and nearly three full strikeouts below the median (8.4).

• Notre Dame righthander Pat Connaughton is one of the best pitching athletes in the college game as a basketball player. His upside on the mound is considerable if he is solely dedicated to the craft, and his numbers mean much less than any other prospect because of his situation, but his athleticism has been slow to enter into production. Connaughton has walked more (5.8) than he has struck out (5.2) this season. He did show significant progress with his control by cutting his walk rate substantially as the season went on.


POSITION PLAYERS

Rk Name PA AVG OBP SLG SB SBA ISO BABIP BB SO BB % SO % SO/BB
8 Michael Conforto, of, Oregon State 251 .364 .518 .578 4 8 .214 .415 50 35 19.9% 13.9% 0.7
9 Trea Turner, ss, North Carolina State 257 .321 .418 .516 26 30 .195 .328 37 25 14.4% 9.7% 0.7
10 Max Pentecost, c, Kennesaw State 278 .423 .477 .634 16 18 .211 .438 24 24 8.6% 8.6% 1.0
14 Bradley Zimmer, of, San Francisco 258 .368 .461 .573 21 32 .205 .413 31 34 12.0% 13.2% 1.1
17 Kyle Schwarber, c/1b, Indiana 260 .340 .450 .623 10 13 .283 .345 41 27 15.8% 10.4% 0.7
29 Casey Gillaspie, 1b, Wichita State 271 .389 .520 .682 8 8 .293 .396 58 28 21.4% 10.3% 0.5
30 Alex Blandino, 3b, Stanford 236 .306 .396 .541 2 3 .235 .295 26 26 11.0% 11.0% 1.0
31 Derek Fisher, of, Virginia 138 .283 .341 .425 4 7 .142 .311 9 18 6.5% 13.0% 2.0
41 A.J. Reed, 1b/lhp, Kentucky 273 .351 .491 .768 0 1 .417 .354 47 46 17.2% 16.8% 1.0
43 Mike Papi, of/1b, Virginia 262 .289 .442 .487 6 9 .198 .307 51 41 19.5% 15.6% 0.8
56 Sam Travis, 1b, Indiana 255 .342 .408 .561 8 13 .219 .351 22 25 8.6% 9.8% 1.1
64 Matt Chapman, 3b/rhp, Cal State Fullerton 233 .321 .418 .516 6 8 .195 .331 24 25 10.3% 10.7% 1.0
69 Brian Anderson, 2b/of, Arkansas 271 .311 .384 .469 9 11 .158 .335 19 13 7.0% 4.8% 0.7
74 Aramis Garcia, c, Florida International 195 .365 .441 .604 4 5 .239 .372 25 23 12.8% 11.8% 0.9
86 Grayson Greiner, c, South Carolina 232 .328 .403 .515 0 0 .187 .356 27 36 11.6% 15.5% 1.3
87 Taylor Sparks, 3b/1b, UC Irvine 257 .290 .375 .475 7 15 .185 .378 25 64 9.7% 24.9% 2.6
89 Aaron Brown, lhp/of, Pepperdine 239 .320 .360 .562 5 8 .242 .356 8 49 3.3% 20.5% 6.1
93 Dylan Davis, of/rhp, Oregon State 245 .286 .343 .429 4 8 .143 .296 20 28 8.2% 11.4% 1.4
102 Connor Joe, c/1b, San Diego 264 .367 .462 .606 3 6 .239 .376 32 24 12.1% 9.1% 0.8
103 Jordan Luplow, of, Fresno State 262 .377 .475 .609 10 14 .232 .381 36 22 13.7% 8.4% 0.6
107 Taylor Gushue, c, Florida 261 .323 .385 .477 1 1 .154 .340 23 35 8.8% 13.4% 1.5
111 Mark Zagunis, c, Virginia Tech 251 .330 .426 .426 16 19 .096 .351 32 20 12.7% 8.0% 0.6
117 Nick Torres, of, Cal Poly 252 .323 .375 .478 4 8 .155 .335 12 24 4.8% 9.5% 0.8
118 J.D. Davis, of/3b/1b/rhp, Cal State Fullerton 254 .338 .425 .521 7 7 .183 .416 32 49 12.6% 19.3% 1.5
123 Austin Byler, 3b/1b, Nevada 263 .326 .420 .624 7 11 .298 .356 25 48 9.5% 18.3% 1.9
131 Jose Trevino, c/3b, Oral Roberts 256 .304 .359 .491 4 4 .187 .302 20 25 7.8% 9.8% 1.3
133 Brett Austin, c, North Carolina State 247 .344 .414 .516 8 9 .172 .371 27 29 10.9% 11.7% 1.1
134 Michael Russell, ss, North Carolina 258 .345 .430 .505 13 18 .160 .373 29 26 11.2% 10.1% 0.9
139 Austin Slater, of, Stanford 220 .349 .400 .497 5 6 .148 .376 16 23 7.3% 10.5% 1.4
150 Joey Pankake, 3b/lf, South Carolina 240 .307 .396 .434 4 8 .127 .315 27 19 11.3% 7.9% 0.7
160 Eudor Garcia, 3B, El Paso (Texas) CC 213 .460 .512 .873 3 4 .413 .445 20 13 9.4% 6.1% 0.7
162 Greg Allen, of, San Diego State 288 .310 .392 .391 25 30 .081 .345 29 31 10.1% 10.8% 1.1
163 Shane Zeile, c, UCLA 248 .324 .401 .421 5 9 .097 .378 21 38 8.5% 15.3% 1.8
165 Brandon Downes, of, Virginia 224 .218 .324 .372 9 11 .154 .231 24 39 10.7% 17.4% 1.6
168 Skyler Ewing, c/1b, Rice 265 .330 .398 .496 0 0 .166 .351 27 34 10.2% 12.8% 1.3
170 Richard Prigatano, of, Long Beach State 231 .314 .430 .404 18 20 .090 .374 34 35 14.7% 15.2% 1.0
177 Michael Katz, 1b, William & Mary 281 .363 .445 .646 0 1 .283 .393 32 43 11.4% 15.3% 1.3
178 Austin Cousino, of, Kentucky 280 .298 .355 .435 17 18 .137 .327 11 38 3.9% 13.6% 3.5
190 Caleb Adams, of, Louisiana-Lafayette 249 .386 .504 .711 5 9 .325 .475 38 53 15.3% 21.3% 1.4
Median 255 .328 .418 .516 6 8 .187 .356 27 28 .109 .117 1.1

PITCHERS

Rk Name IP TBF BB SO BB% S0% BB/9 SO/9 SO/BB ERA BABIP
3 Carlos Rodon, lhp, North Carolina State 98.7 419 31 117 7.4% 27.9% 2.83 10.67 3.77 2.01 .323
5 Kyle Freeland, lhp, Evansville 99.7 399 13 128 3.3% 32.1% 1.17 11.56 9.85 1.90 .324
7 Aaron Nola, rhp, Louisiana State 109.0 417 26 127 6.2% 30.5% 2.15 10.49 4.88 1.49 .243
11 Sean Newcomb, lhp, Hartford 93.3 358 38 106 10.6% 29.6% 3.66 10.22 2.79 1.25 .241
13 Jeff Hoffman, rhp, East Carolina 67.3 278 20 72 7.2% 25.9% 2.67 9.62 3.60 2.94 .277
15 Tyler Beede, rhp, Vanderbilt 98.3 418 43 106 10.6% 26.0% 3.94 9.70 2.46 3.20 .276
18 Brandon Finnegan, lhp, Texas Christian 84.0 335 24 110 7.2% 32.8% 2.57 11.79 4.58 2.14 .311
24 Erick Fedde, rhp, UNLV 76.7 306 21 82 6.9% 26.8% 2.47 9.63 3.90 1.76 .285
25 Nick Howard, rhp, Virginia 28.3 116 12 50 10.3% 43.1% 3.81 15.88 4.17 2.22 .308
36 Nick Burdi, rhp, Louisville 32.0 128 8 57 6.3% 44.5% 2.25 16.03 7.13 0.56 .230
38 Luke Weaver, rhp, Florida State 101.3 402 22 81 5.5% 20.1% 1.95 7.19 3.68 2.66 .264
45 Michael Cederoth, rhp, San Diego State 51.3 215 28 55 13.0% 25.6% 4.91 9.64 1.96 2.28 .270
50 Jacob Lindgren, lhp, Mississippi State 51.0 204 21 93 10.3% 45.6% 3.71 16.41 4.43 0.88 .238
58 Matt Imhof, lhp, Cal Poly 91.7 365 38 120 10.4% 32.9% 3.73 11.78 3.16 2.55 .299
61 Brett Graves, rhp, Missouri 93.0 394 18 64 4.6% 16.2% 1.74 6.19 3.56 3.87 .311
66 Chris Oliver, rhp, Arkansas 88.3 352 30 55 8.5% 15.6% 3.06 5.60 1.83 2.45 .242
67 Jake Stinnett, rhp, Maryland 104.0 425 26 123 6.1% 28.9% 2.25 10.64 4.73 2.6 .252
71 Chris Ellis, rhp, Mississippi 95.3 403 29 54 7.2% 13.4% 2.74 5.10 1.86 2.17 .284
75 Andrew Suarez, lhp, Miami 100.7 423 15 77 3.5% 18.2% 1.34 6.88 5.13 3.22 .301
75 James Norwood, rhp, Saint Louis 94.0 389 28 64 7.2% 16.5% 2.68 6.13 2.29 2.68 .276
78 Zech Lemond, rhp, Rice 51.3 213 15 49 7.0% 23.0% 2.63 8.59 3.27 1.4 .266
82 Austin Gomber, lhp, Florida Atlantic 77.3 333 15 72 4.5% 21.6% 1.75 8.38 4.80 3.26 .311
83 Spencer Turnbull, rhp, Alabama 82.0 340 27 66 7.9% 19.4% 2.96 7.24 2.44 3.07 .238
89 Aaron Brown, lhp/of, Pepperdine 100.7 401 34 96 8.5% 23.9% 3.04 8.58 2.82 2.24 .290
90 Daniel Gossett, rhp, Clemson 101.3 407 30 102 7.4% 25.1% 2.66 9.06 3.40 1.78 .246
91 Jace Fry, lhp, Oregon State 113.7 446 29 94 6.5% 21.1% 2.30 7.44 3.24 1.43 .243
94 Wyatt Strahan, rhp, Southern California 104.3 456 49 89 10.7% 19.5% 4.23 7.68 1.82 3.28 .301
97 Jake Cosart, rhp, Seminole State (Fla.) JC 64.0 23 67 NA NA 3.23 9.42 2.91 5.34 NA
101 Eric Skoglund, lhp, Central Florida 110.0 440 27 94 6.1% 21.4% 2.21 7.69 3.48 2.54 .273
112 Dillon Peters, lhp, Texas 80.3 334 21 53 6.3% 15.9% 2.35 5.94 2.52 2.13 .286
113 Adam Ravenelle, rhp, Vanderbilt 33.3 130 14 32 10.8% 24.6% 3.78 8.64 2.29 1.35 .202
114 A.J. Vanegas, rhp, Stanford 33.3 136 10 23 7.4% 16.9% 2.70 6.21 2.30 2.16 .275
120 Jordan Montgomery, lhp, South Carolina 92.0 389 29 86 7.5% 22.1% 2.84 8.41 2.97 3.52 .308
122 Sam Howard, lhp, Georgia Southern 86.7 352 18 84 5.1% 23.9% 1.87 8.72 4.67 2.6 .306
125 Jalen Beeks, lhp, Arkansas 76.7 303 18 59 5.9% 19.5% 2.11 6.93 3.28 2.11 .283
126 Chris Diaz, lhp, Miami 93.7 402 38 80 9.5% 19.9% 3.65 7.69 2.11 2.31 .298
128 Jordan Foley, rhp, Central Michigan 97.7 441 28 81 6.3% 18.4% 2.58 7.46 2.89 3.69 .316
129 Pat Connaughton, rhp, Notre Dame 62.0 277 40 36 14.4% 13.0% 5.81 5.23 0.90 3.92 .266
136 Sam Coonrod, rhp, Southern Illinois 84.7 373 47 77 12.6% 20.6% 5.00 8.19 1.64 2.87 .283
137 Jeremy Rhoades, rhp, Illinois State 76.7 323 25 92 7.7% 28.5% 2.94 10.80 3.68 2.35 .320
140 Josh Prevost, rhp, Seton Hall 116.3 440 20 111 4.5% 25.2% 1.55 8.59 5.55 1.62 .203
141 Ryan Butler, rhp, Charlotte 83.0 372 27 49 7.3% 13.2% 2.93 5.31 1.81 3.47 .314
142 Max Povse, rhp, UNC Greensboro 59.3 360 27 81 7.5% 22.5% 4.10 12.29 3.00 4.99 .401
143 Daniel Mengden, rhp, Texas A&M 101.3 442 27 94 6.1% 21.3% 2.40 8.35 3.48 3.55 .308
144 Sam Clay, lhp, Georgia Tech 54.3 221 28 63 12.7% 28.5% 4.64 10.44 2.25 1.33 .280
147 Brent Jones, rhp, Cornell 50.3 213 13 47 6.1% 22.1% 2.32 8.40 3.62 2.5 .297
155 Jake Reed, rhp, Oregon 34.7 134 15 32 11.2% 23.9% 3.89 8.31 2.13 2.08 .229
156 Tyler Willman, rhp, Western Illinois 83.7 381 50 63 13.1% 16.5% 5.38 6.78 1.26 3.66 .307
157 Mason McCullough, rhp, Lander (S.C.) 61.7 56 85 NA NA 8.17 12.41 1.52 4.09 NA
158 Cy Sneed, rhp, Dallas Baptist 98.0 420 34 78 8.1% 18.6% 3.12 7.16 2.29 3.67 .296
159 John Curtiss, rhp, Texas 32.3 137 13 24 9.5% 17.5% 3.62 6.68 1.85 2.51 .265
164 Jordan Brink, rhp, Fresno State 84.7 365 44 62 12.1% 17.0% 4.68 6.59 1.41 2.87 .248
167 Mitch Watrous, rhp, Utah 96.7 410 26 76 6.3% 18.5% 2.42 7.08 2.92 3.91 .288
174 Colin Welmon, rhp, Loyola Marymount 106.3 424 19 58 4.5% 13.7% 1.61 4.91 3.05 2.37 .257
181 Reed Reilly, rhp, Cal Poly 43.0 165 17 52 10.3% 31.5% 3.56 10.88 3.06 1.67 .219
Median 84.66 365 26 77 7.4% 22.1% 2.83 8.40 3.0 2.5 .283

College | #College Stat Roundup

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