James Bailey

Book Review: Uppity

James Bailey -

If people who know the man had any doubt where they stood with Bill White, they won't after reading his new memoir, "Uppity: My Untold Story about the Games People Play." White, whose long and varied career afforded him a view of the game from just about every angle, doesn't hold back, sharing his candid thoughts about a number of people with whom he crossed paths over the years.

Majors | #2011#Book Guide

Book Review: Campy

James Bailey -

Neil Lanctot's new biography about former Dodgers catcher Roy Campanella does a good job telling the sometimes complicated story of Campanella's highs and lows on and off the field.

Majors | #2011#Book Guide

The Best Baseball Books Of 2010

James Bailey -

In baseball literary circles, 2010 will be remembered as the year of the biography. We had noteworthy releases this year on Hall of Famers Hank Aaron, Willie Mays, Mickey Mantle, Joe Cronin, and Charles Radbourn. Roger Maris fell short of Cooperstown, but the new bio on him ranks right up there with the other greats, as does that of late Yankees owner George Steinbrenner, who appeared for the first time on the veteran's committee ballot this fall.

Majors | #2010#Book Guide

Book Reviews: Two Books Spread Love Of ’70s Baseball

James Bailey -

Two new books celebrate baseball in the 1970s. In "When the Game Changed: An Oral History of Baseball's True Golden Age: 1969-1979" George Castle taps the men who played and managed to tell the era's story in their own words. Dan Epstein tries to infuse some hipness while summarizing the decade's happenings in "Big Hair and Plastic Grass: A Funky Ride Through Baseball and America in the Swinging '70s."

Majors | #2010#Book Guide

DVD Review: Time In The Minors

James Bailey -

Tony Okun does a wonderful job of personifying the struggle to make it through the minor leagues in his documentary "Time in the Minors." The video, which was mostly shot during the 2006 season, follows the progress of veteran minor league infielder Tony Schrager and Indians '05 supplemental first-rounder John Drennen, an outfielder.

Majors | #2010#Book Guide

Book Review: Diamond Ruby

James Bailey -

The seeds for "Diamond Ruby" were planted in history, more than 70 years ago. In a 1931 exhibition game between the Chattanooga Lookouts and New York Yankees, a 16-year-old girl named Jackie Mitchell struck out Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig on a combined total of seven pitches. For her troubles she was rewarded with a ban by baseball commissioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis. Joseph Wallace, intrigued by Mitchell's story, borrowed her fastball and spirit for Ruby Thomas, the plucky heroine of his new novel. Ruby's story, however, is not Jackie Mitchell's story. In fact, Wallace set the tale in early 1920s Brooklyn, giving Ruby a shot at the Babe nearly a decade before Jackie's 15 minutes of fame occurred.

Majors | #2010#Book Guide